Azzera filtri
Azzera filtri

problem in curve fitting using summation of sine functions

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i wanted to fit the summation of sine functions in the following data: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1OzD-Dcra6j4Xn6nCWy4zFUUTObcIHbwq/view?usp=drive_link and https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gC00X5qEbqPlIBzsFNk9kQSmhVM44lEr/view?usp=drive_link, i am using curve fitter tool box for this, but fitted curve is not coming what i want. i am attaching the pic for reference. please any one help.
  5 Commenti
John D'Errico
John D'Errico il 10 Mar 2024
So what was wrong with the multiplle answers you did get here? Was there a compelling reason to keep on asking the same question?
nihal
nihal il 10 Mar 2024
Because I want to know @Alex done this curve fitting. I am facing same issue with theta_dot data set. Answer provided by you is also correct.

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Risposta accettata

Alex Sha
Alex Sha il 9 Mar 2024
@nihal if don't mind fitting function other than summation of sine, much better result will be achieved.
For phi_dot data:
Result:
Sum Squared Error (SSE): 5.9320020125328
Root of Mean Square Error (RMSE): 0.034854373653761
Correlation Coef. (R): 0.998694235877059
R-Square: 0.997390176774062
Parameter Best Estimate
--------- -------------
p1 -6.47104419670817
p2 -5.98261682333558
p3 6.97174098381172
p4 2.12628676769052
p5 2.46804771859176
p6 1.86197168986149
p7 45.118903356855
p8 -0.275472905476552
p9 -24.2903853518025
p10 -3.04940813819318
For theta_dot data:
Result:
Sum Squared Error (SSE): 17477.3796297918
Root of Mean Square Error (RMSE): 2.03435911509887
Correlation Coef. (R): 0.99924491377999
R-Square: 0.998490397715179
Parameter Best Estimate
--------- -------------
p1 16.6617050215943
p2 13.9664063412695
p3 -14.6357178726065
p4 8.23236922174309
p5 -14.4468349720996
p6 -92.0366152695814
p7 99.9974678533004
p8 -98.6269424999215
p9 -33512.5352364955
p10 98.8356843265421
p11 -57.1951273322505
p12 -24.1093307498757
p13 42.2121329296961
p14 6.50567474900366
p15 16.8130006928835
p16 33512.1242507784
  9 Commenti
nihal
nihal il 14 Mar 2024
CAN YOU TELL ME FROM WHERE IT CAN BE DOWNLOADED , I TRIED FROM SITES BUT NOT ABLE TO DO IT. PLEASE HELP ME ON THIS REGARD
Alex Sha
Alex Sha il 15 Mar 2024
Please refer to this web link:
As far as I know, there is no download link。

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Più risposte (2)

John D'Errico
John D'Errico il 9 Mar 2024
Modificato: John D'Errico il 9 Mar 2024
Ok. Thank you for the data. The plot does help a lot actually. At first glance, the plot of the fit itself looks quite reasonable. But then I focused my old bleary eyes on it, and I see the sinusoidal oscillations in the curve near the flat regions. (When I said I might guess what the problem was, this is what I was thinking.)
That is a common consequence of trying to fit a flat curve (or a curve with flat or nearly flat sections) with a sum of sine waves. Higher frequency sine functions will just introduce more (higher frequency) wiggles in the flats. Take enough terms and eventually the bumps go away, at least to the point you do not see them. But this just argues you did not take enough terms in the model.
It is exactly like the presence of Gibbs phenomena in a fit. In fact, if you look at the figures in the wiki page I link here, you will see that same behavior.
Again, taking more terms in that series will improve the fit, beause the oscillations will eventually cancel out. You don't have any sharp transition in your data, so there are no large overshoots near the edges. But even so, there will still be the same characteristic oscillations in the region of the curve that want to be nearly flat.
So, how can you improve on that result? Again, the simple solution is to just throw more terms at the problem. If you insist on having a model that is a sum of sines (and cosines usually) that will work, to drive down the oscillations. They will still be there of course, only at a finer level. Nothing you can do will prevent that in such a model.
Alternatively, you could use a spline model of sorts. Perhaps a smoothing spline would be a good choice, or a least squares spline. But splines have their own issues of course. People always want to write down the function, and you simply cannot write down some nice looking function from a spline. You can use them to evaluate, or make a nice smooth plot.
  1 Commento
nihal
nihal il 9 Mar 2024
Thank you for the response, but the curve tool box matlab only go upto terms. Same issue is there when fourier function is used. If i use spline then it can not be helped in my further analysis

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John D'Errico
John D'Errico il 9 Mar 2024
Modificato: John D'Errico il 9 Mar 2024
I'll post this as a separate answer, so as to not get it lost in the comments, and since I will show you how to solve it as a trig series. I'll use backslash to perform the solve. I could have used many other tools, but this is actually a purely linear problem! (In the parameters, that is.)
phidot = readtable('phi_dot.csv');
x = phidot.Var1;
y = phidot.Var2;
plot(x,y)
yline(0)
per = 6.9; % approximate length of the period, determined by observation, where the curve crosses the x axis.
nterms = 8;
n = 1:nterms;
% model as a sum of sine and cosine terms
% the first coefficient is just an additive constant,
% the next nterms coefficients apply to the sine terms,
% then the last nterms coefficients apply to cosine terms
A = [ones(size(x)),sin(2*pi*x*n/per),cos(2*pi*x*n/per)];
coeffs = A\y;
ypred = A*coeffs;
plot(x,y,'b-',x,ypred,'-r')
With 8 terms, this will be approximately what the curve fitting toolbox would have done (using the 'sin8' option for fittype. Next, I'll redo the fit, using 20 terms in the model.
nterms = 20;
n = 1:nterms;
% model as a sum of sine and cosine terms
A = [ones(size(x)),sin(2*pi*x*n/per),cos(2*pi*x*n/per)];
coeffs = A\y;
ypred = A*coeffs;
plot(x,ypred,'-r')
I plotted only the curve this time, since you would miss what it does in the flat spots otherwise. As you can see, the oscillations decrease. No matter what you do, with more terms the wiggles will get smaller, but this is a FUNDAMENTAL characteristic of a trig series when used to fit such a problem.
nterms = 50;
n = 1:nterms;
% model as a sum of sine and cosine terms
A = [ones(size(x)),sin(2*pi*x*n/per),cos(2*pi*x*n/per)];
coeffs = A\y;
ypred = A*coeffs;
plot(x,ypred,'-r')
The last plot was with 50 terms in the series. You should see there the wiggles are almost impossible to see. Again, this is just a fundamental characterisitic of such a model.
Finally, note that you can ALWAYS transform a pair of terms of the form
a1*sin(b*x) + a2*cos(b*x)
combining them both into a single phase shifted sine term only. That is just a basic trig identity. I won't show how to do that unless there is some need for it.
So while the model I fit used both sine and cosine terms, you could do the transformation I mention easily enough to reduce the number of terms.

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